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  • Knee Pain

Knee Pain

ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) and PCL (posterior cruciate ligament) Injury

ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) and PCL (posterior cruciate ligament) tears are common knee injuries, especially for athletes.

The ACL and PCL are two of four ligaments that stabilize the knee joint, allowing the knee to move forward and backward without moving side to side.The ACL is located in the center of the knee just in front of the PCL, keeping the shin bone (tibia) from moving too far forward, while the PCL keeps it from moving too far backward.The ligaments cross over each other, and along with the MCL and LCL, work to stabilize the knee joint.Injuries to these ligaments are more often sprains than tears, although partial or full tears can occur to either ligament.

MCL / LCL injury

The medial collateral ligament (MCL) and lateral collateral ligament (LCL) are two of four ligaments in the knee that provide stability to the knee joint, along with the ACL and PCL. The medial collateral ligament (MCL) and lateral collateral ligament (LCL) are two of four ligaments in the knee that provide stability to the knee joint, along with the ACL and PCL.

The MCL is located on the inner side of the knee and the LCL is located on the outer side and these two ligaments work to control the side to side stability of the knee joint.When the MCL or LCL is injured, it can result in a sprain, partial tear or full tear, depending on the severity.

Meniscus / Cartilage damage

A meniscus tear occurs when there is a partial or full tear in one of the two menisci that are located within the knee joint. A meniscus is a C-shaped disc composed of cartilage in the knee that balances body weight across the knee so that it is evenly distributed among the bones in your legs. A meniscus tear occurs when there is a partial or full tear in one of the two menisci that are located within the knee joint.

A meniscus is a C-shaped disc composed of cartilage in the knee that balances body weight across the knee so that it is evenly distributed among the bones in your legs. One meniscus is located along the inner edge of the knee (medial meniscus) and the other is located along the outer edge (lateral meniscus). Meniscus tears are a very common knee injury.

Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome – Runners Knee

Patellofemoral pain syndrome, also called “runner’s knee”, is one of the more common sports related injuries affecting the knee, and refers to a condition that causes pain behind and around the knee cap. The patella, or knee cap, fits into grooves in the femur (the thigh bone) and is also attached to the tibia (shin bone) and the quadriceps muscles in the thigh. As the patella moves within the grooves of the femur (it can move in many directions), irritation may develop, causing pain.

The exact cause of patellofemoral pain syndrome is unknown but the condition appears more often in athletes that engage in high impact sports, such as running, jumping, bicycling and walking. Body alignment issues, such as those caused by differences in muscle strength, balance, or unequal physical development may contribute to the condition. Other causes may include overpronation of the feet, wearing improper or worn out footwear while exercising, or undeveloped muscle strength in the thighs.

Patella Tendonitis – Jumpers Knee

Patellar tendonitis, also called “jumper’s knee”, is an inflammation of the patellar tendon, a cord-like structure that connects the patella (knee cap) to the tibia (shin bone). Tendonitis causes pain due to inflammation, swelling, and minor tears in the tendon.
Patellar tendonitis, also called “jumper’s knee”, is an inflammation of the patellar tendon, a cord-like structure that connects the patella (knee cap) to the tibia (shin bone). Tendonitis causes pain due to inflammation, swelling, and minor tears in the tendon. In some cases, a loss of mobility of the joint will occur due to excessive inflammation.

Patellar tendonitis is often caused by repetitive overuse of the knee that causes irritation and inflammation of the patellar tendon and is most common in athletes that engage in sports involving a great deal of jumping or changing direction rapidly, such as in basketball, volleyball, or soccer. Repeated jumping or an increase in intensity, duration or frequency of activity can stress the tendon.The condition, however, is not solely an overuse injury and can also be seen in individuals that have a muscular imbalance in their legs, a raised knee cap, tight leg muscles, or a difference in the alignment of bones in the leg, all of which can place stress on the patellar tendon. Patellar tendonitis can also be caused by a direct trauma to the joint, can occur in conjunction with other conditions and injuries, or can be caused by some medical conditions (such as rheumatoid arthritis and gout).

Chondromalacia Patella

Chondromalacia patella refers to the degeneration of cartilage under the patella (knee cap) which results in pain in the front of the knee. The degeneration causes the cartilage to soften and is the most common cause of chronic knee pain.

Chondromalacia patella is typically caused by overuse of the knee joint, too much force being placed on the knee over time, or arthritis. The condition can also be caused by a previous injury to the knee cap, such as a fracture or dislocation, or can occur in individuals that have a misaligned knee cap. Muscle weakness of the quadriceps, hamstrings, or hip abductor muscles can add to the pain caused by this condition, as can problems with the feet, such as overpronation, flat feet, or wearing worn out shoes.

Arthritis (Osteoarthritis / Rheumatoid Arthritis)

There are many type of arthritis, a condition that primarily causes inflammation, pain and limited mobility in the joints. Symptoms of arthritis are caused by a breakdown of cartilage surrounding the joint, which normally acts like a shock absorber and prevents bones from rubbing together.

There are many type of arthritis, a condition that primarily causes inflammation, pain and limited mobility in the joints. Symptoms of arthritis are caused by a breakdown of cartilage surrounding the joint, which normally acts like a shock absorber and prevents bones from rubbing together. Some types of arthritis are a result of regular or excessive wear and tear on the joints and cartilage surrounding the joints, while others are a result of metabolic or immune system abnormalities, infections or injury. Each type of arthritis has slightly different symptoms, causes and treatments.

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