Get in touch for further information or to book an appointment by clicking here.
  • Elbow Pain

Elbow Pain

Tennis Elbow

Tennis elbow, also known as lateral epicondylitis, is pain or inflammation on the outside of the arm near the elbow, where the muscles and tendons in the forearm attach to the elbow’s bony area. In some cases, a partial tear of a tendon, which attaches the muscles to the bone of the elbow, may occur. Pain can be felt in the elbow, forearm, wrist, or back of hand.

Tennis elbow is often caused by the overuse or repetitive use of the muscles in the forearm, wrist and throughout the arm. Despite its name, the condition is not solely caused by playing tennis, although it is a common injury among those that play tennis due to the overuse of the muscles that can cause the condition during the sport. The injury can occur from a sudden and abrupt injury to the tendons and muscles in the forearm, or more typically can occur over time due to repeated overuse of the muscles in the forearm and wrist. The condition is more common in men than women and often affects people that are involved in repetitive use activities for work or leisure.

Golfers Elbow

Golfer’s elbow, also known as medial epicondylitis, is pain or inflammation on the inside of the arm near the elbow, where the muscles and tendons in the forearm attach to the elbow’s interior bony area. In some cases, a partial tear of the tendon, which attaches the muscles to the bone of the elbow, may occur. Pain can be felt in the elbow, forearm, wrist, or fingers.

Golfer’s elbow is often caused by the overuse or repetitive use of the muscles in the wrist or fingers. Despite its name, the condition is not solely caused by playing golf, although it is a common injury among those that play golf due to the overuse of the muscles that can cause the condition during the sport. The injury can occur from a sudden and abrupt injury to the tendons and muscles in the forearm or a sudden and severe force to the wrist or elbow, or more typically can occur over time due to repeated overuse of the muscles in the wrist and fingers. The condition is more common in men than women and often affects people that are involved in repetitive use activities for work or leisure that may stress the wrists or fingers.

Ulnar Neuropathy

Ulnar neuropathy is a condition in which the ulnar nerve, a major nerve that runs from the neck along the outside edge of the arm into the hand, becomes inflamed due to compression of the nerve. The inflammation causes tingling, numbness, weakness and pain primarily along the elbow, underside of the forearm, wrist or outside edge of the hand, extending towards the pinky and ring fingers. This condition is sometimes referred to as “handlebar palsy” or “bicycler’s neuropathy” since it is a common injury found in cyclists due to repetitive gripping of a bicycle’s handlebars.

Ulnar neuropathy is caused by inflammation due to compression of the ulnar nerve. This can occur from repetitive wrist or elbow movements, motions that continuously stretch the ulnar nerve (such as gripping a bicycle’s handlebars or leaning arms on a desk while using a computer) or from trauma to the nerve anywhere along the path of the nerve (although trauma most commonly occurs in the elbow or wrist). This is a common injury among cyclists due to the repetitive bumps and bounces that can irritate the ulnar nerve while riding. Certain medical conditions can also cause ulnar nerve inflammation or damage, such as diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and infections. Ulnar neuropathy is more likely to occur in men than women and is more likely in older adults since it typically has a gradual onset of symptoms.

Elbow Sprain

An elbow sprain or strain involves an injury to the soft tissues of the elbow. Sprains involve injury to one or more of the three ligaments (the bands of tissue that connect bones together) within the joint, the radial or ulnar collateral ligaments or the annular ligament of radius. Strains refer to injuries of muscles and tendons surrounding the joint, the lateral or medial epicondyle. Sprains of the elbow are less common than strains. Common elbow strains include conditions such as tennis elbow and golfer’s elbow.

Most elbow sprains occur when there is a traumatic impact to the elbow that causes it to twist sharply or bend sideways or backward in an unnatural motion. This can occur during a fall or during contact sports or other types of collisions (such as motor vehicle accidents). Elbow strains usually occur from acute or chronic (repetitive) overuse or overstretching of the muscles or tendons in the elbow, arm or wrist.

Olecranon Bursitis

Olecranon bursitis is a condition in which the bursa, the fluid filled sac located at the tip of the elbow between the bones of the elbow and the skin, becomes inflamed. The function of the bursa is to allow the skin to move freely over the bones in the elbow but when this area is inflamed, pain develops and it may be difficult to move the elbow freely.

Anything that results in a build-up of fluid or swelling of the elbow can cause olecranon bursitis. This includes a direct injury to the tip of the elbow, an infection around the elbow in which bacteria may enter the bursa causing it to swell, a growth that narrows the space where the bursa is situated (such as a bone spur), repetitive pressure on the tip of the elbow (i.e., leaning your elbow on a hard table for long periods of time), or certain medical conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis or gout.

Get in touch for further information or to book an appointment by clicking here.